Patti Page On Rainbow Wednesday


PPageNoAcesUpClose

I have “No Aces” as the B side to another Patti Page 7″ disc but I couldn’t resist picking up this green copy when I saw it. Taking a picture of it flat doesn’t do the color much justice. Holding it up to the window or a light shows the true hue.

PPageNoAces

Side One

No Aces

Side Two

No Aces

I Believe There’s Nothing Stronger Than Paul Anka’s Love


It seems so foreign of a concept to not have every minor detail of a celebrity’s life monitored. I read TMZ, Hollywood Life, FishWrapper, Buzzfeed, etc. every day to keep up on all the celebrity gossip. At times I feel guilty, like what would happen if I were in their position? I’d flip the fuck out on paparazzi or dumb interviewers all the time. I really don’t have the patience for that. I guess that’s why I didn’t find it that surprising an incident from the ’80s managed to follow Paul Anka up into the true digital age (I consider that like mid ’90s to today personally).

In the mid-1980s, Anka was secretly recorded while launching a tirade against his crew and band members, berating them for behavior that he considered unprofessional. When asked about it on the interview program Fresh Air, he referred to the person who did the recording as a “snake we later fired”. The recording became widely known after being uploaded to the Internet and a number of quotes from it have since become famous, including “The guys get shirts!”; “Don’t make a maniac out of me!“; and “Slice like a fucking hammer!“. Some of the quotes were reproduced verbatim by Al Pacino’s character in the 2007 film Ocean’s Thirteen.

PAnkaNothingStrongerThanOurLove

Side One

(I Believe) There’s Nothing Stronger Than Our Love

Side Two

Today I Became a Fool

The Waltz Queen


The Waltz Queen Patti Page

The Waltz Queen

Patti Page

Side One

What’ll I Do
Memories
Till We Meet Again
Whispering Winds
Remember
Now is the Hour

Side Two

You Always Hurt the One You Love
The Boy Next Door
Falling in Love with Love
Let the Rest of the World Go By
That’s All I’ll Ever Ask of You
Wondering

Piddily Patti Page Will Remember Today As The Day She Crossed Over The Bridge To Find Love


PPageCrossOverBridge

Side One

Cross Over the Bridge

Side Two

My Restless Lover

PPageIllRememberToday

Side One

I’ll Remember Today

Side Two

My How the Time Goes By

PPageYouWillFindYourLove

Side One

You Will Find Your Love

Side Two

Fibbin’

PPagePiddilyPatterPatter

Side One

Piddily Patter Patter

Side Two

Every Day

Hold Me ‘Til The Mornin’ Sickness Comes Because You’re Having My Baby


This has absolutely nothing to do with babies really, I just couldn’t help myself from keeping these two singles together to make the post title.

PAnkaHavingMyBaby

Side One

(You’re) Having My Baby

Side Two

Papa

PAnkaHoldMeMorninComes

Side One

Hold Me ’til the Mornin’ Comes

Side Two

This is the First Time

Patience & Prudence Are Gonna Get Along Without Ya Now


Patience Ann and Prudence Ann McIntyre (born in August 15, 1942 and July 12, 1945 respectively) known professionally as Patience and Prudence, were two sisters who were a young singing act from 1956 to 1964.

Patience & Prudence Gonna Get Along without Ya Now

Side One

Gonna Get Along without Ya Now

Side Two

 

A Day In The Life Of Wes Montgomery


John Leslie “Wes” Montgomery (March 6, 1923 – June 15, 1968) was an American jazz guitarist.

He is widely considered one of the major jazz guitarists, emerging after such seminal figures as Django Reinhardt and Charlie Christian and influencing countless others. While many jazz players are regarded as virtuosos, Montgomery had a very wide influence on other virtuosos who followed him, having also earned the respect of his contemporaries.

Dave Miele and Dan Bielowsky claim, “Wes Montgomery was certainly one of the most influential and most musical guitarists to ever pick up the instrument… He took the use of octaves and chord melodies to a greater level than any other guitarist, before or since… Montgomery is undoubtedly one of the most important voices in Jazz guitar that has ever lived-or most likely ever will live. A discussion of Jazz guitar is simply not thorough if it does not touch upon Wes Montgomery“.

WesMontgomeryDayInTheLife

A Day in the Life

Wes Montgomery

Side One

A Day in the Life
Watch What Happens
When a Man Loves a Woman
California Nights
Angel

Side Two

Eleanor Rigby
Willow Weep for Me
Windy
Trust in Me
The Joker

WesMontgomeryDayInTheLifeInsert

Patti Page’s Tennessee Waltz


Towards the end of 1950, Patti Page’s version of “Tennessee Waltz” became her second No. 1 hit, and her most-popular and biggest-selling single.

The song spent 13 weeks at No. 1 between 1950 and 1951. It also became Page’s second single to reach the country chart, becoming her biggest hit there, reaching No. 2. The song would later become one of the best-selling records of the time, selling seven million copies in the early 1950s, which prompted various cover versions of the song to appear on the charts during the year.

“Tennessee Waltz” has also represented the biggest commercial success to date for the overdubbing technique, pioneered by producer Mitch Miller, which enabled Page to sound as if she were harmonizing with herself.

PattiPageTennesseeWaltz

Side One

The Tennessee Waltz

Side Two

With My Eyes Wide Open I’m Dreaming