Shalamar!


This was another LP I picked up at Pitchfork in N.H. the other day, When I saw it, I really couldn’t help myself. About 90% of that motivation was because of The Chapelle Show’s Prince skit. You can check it out HERE (sorry, I couldn’t find a version not ripped from a TV screen).

Shalamar was an American music group, active in the 1970s and 1980s, that was originally a disco-driven vehicle created by Soul Train booking agent Dick Griffey and show creator Don Cornelius. They went on to be an influential dance trio, regarded as fashion icons and trendsetters, and helped to introduce ‘body-popping’ to the U.K..

The Line Up

Jeffrey Daniel (1977-1983, 1996-1997, 2001–2013)
Jody Watley (1977-1983, 1996-1997)
Gary Mumford (1977-1978)
Gerald Brown (1978-1979)
Howard Hewett (1979-1985, 1996-1997, 2001–2013)
Delisa Davis (1983-1991)
Micki Free (1983-1991)
Sydney Justin (1985-1991)
Carolyn Griffey (2001-2013)

Shalamar

Shalamar

The Look

Side One

Closer
Dead Giveaway
You Can Count on Me
Right Here
No Limits (The Now Club)

Side Two

Disappearing Act
Over and Over
You’re the One for Me
You Won’t Miss Love (Until It’s Gone)
The Look

Tell Me What You Want Me to Do, I’m Going Round and Round


Tevin Jermod Campbell (born November 12, 1976) is an American singer, songwriter and actor. In 1991, Campbell collaborated with Quincy Jones and released his platinum-selling debut album, T.E.V.I.N..

His double-platinum selling second album, I’m Ready, released in 1993, included two of Campbell’s most popular songs, “Can We Talk” and the album’s title track “I’m Ready”. In 1996, Campbell released his third album, Back to the World, which was not as commercially or critically successful as his first two releases. His self-titled fourth album, Tevin Campbell, was released in 1999, but, performed poorly on Billboard’s album charts.

Apart from music, Campbell commenced an acting career, appearing in Prince’s sequel to Purple Rain, Graffiti Bridge. He made guest appearances on The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air with Will Smith and other TV shows. He was also cast as Seaweed in the Broadway musical Hairspray in 2005.

Throughout his career, Campbell has earned 5 Grammy Award nominations, selling an estimated 3 million album copies worldwide (primarily from his first two albums).

TevinC

Side One

Tell Me What You Want Me to Do

Side Two

Tell Me What You Want Me to Do

TevinC2

Side One

Round and Round

Side Two

Round and Round

Jackie Robinson of Comedy


Well, here’s something they don’t cover in your Black History Month class assignments… I’ll admit, my history on the comedy side of things is a bit weak. I grasp the general facts, mostly because of the overall knowledge of the times, but names are hard for me to come up with. That’s the great thing about this blog, I get to look into different artists’ lives and careers just a little bit more and expand my own awareness.

Timmie Rogers (July 4, 1914 – December 17, 2006) was an American comedian, singer-songwriter, bandleader and actor.

Rogers starred in US television’s first black prime-time show Sugar Hill Times in 1949. He was also a recurring guest star on The Jackie Gleason Show for over 12 years, and would continue to work with Jackie Gleason for the next thirty years. Rogers later credited Gleason for giving him national exposure which helped his career.

Rogers also wrote music including “”If You Can’t Smile and Say Yes”, a song recorded by Nat King Cole. He also wrote songs for Carmen McRae and Sarah Vaughan. In the late 50’s and living in Philadelphia, he recorded on Cameo and Parkway Records. His hits included “Back to School Again” and “I Love Ya, I Love Ya, I Love Ya”.

Rogers was inducted into the National Comedy Hall of Fame in 1993. He was known as the Unknown Pioneer of (Black) Comedy. He insisted on not wearing blackface when performing his comedy act and stood firm with his conviction, dressed well, often wearing a tuxedo. Rogers was one of the first black comedians allowed to directly address a white audience when he worked. Before Rogers, African-American funny men had to either work in pairs or groups, only conversing with each other, and they had to play a character, while popular white comedians got to play themselves.

TimmeRogers

Side One

Back to School Again

Side Two

I’ve Got a Dog Who Loves Me