Sal Says You Shouldn’t Do That


Salvatore “Sal” Mineo, Jr. (January 10, 1939 – February 12, 1976), was an American film and theatre actor, best known for his performance as John “Plato” Crawford in the film Rebel Without a Cause. In 1957, Mineo made a brief foray into pop music by recording a handful of songs and an album. Two of his singles reached the Top 40 in the United States Billboard Hot 100.

After a lull, Mineo’s career had begun to turn aroundby 1976. While playing the role of a bisexual burglar in a series of stage performances of the comedy, P.S. Your Cat Is Dead, in San Francisco, Mineo received substantial publicity from many positive reviews, and he moved to Los Angeles along with the play.

Mineo was arriving home after a rehearsal on February 12, 1976, when he was stabbed to death in the alley behind his apartment building in West Hollywood, California. Mineo was stabbed just once, not repeatedly as first reported, but the knife blade struck his heart, leading to immediate and fatal internal bleeding.

SMineo

Side One

You Shouldn’t Do That

Side Two

Lasting Love

Blue Note’s Three Decades of Jazz (1939 – 1949 Volume 1)


Blue Note is one of those record labels you just need to have in a collection. Luckily, we’ve been able to pick up quite a few recently. Well worth the hunt and prices, we have more set aside at one of the local record stores. Holiday time needs to hit NOW at the day job so I can afford everything I want!

BlueNoteThree DecadesJazz

Blue Note’s Three Decades of Jazz

(1939 – 1949 Volume 1)

Various Artists

Album One

Side One

Boogie Woogie Stomp – Albert Ammons
Port of Harlem Blues – Port of Harlem Jazzmen
Summertime – Sidney Bechet Quintet
The Father’s Getaway – Earl Hines
Honky Tonk Train Blues – Meade Lux Lewis

Side Two

Profoundly Blue – Edmond Hall’s Celeste Quartet
Climax Rag – George Lewis and His New Orleans Stompers
Milk Cow Blues – Josh White Trio
Mule Walk – James P. Johnson
Seein’ Red – Edmond Hall’s All Star Quintet

Album Two

Side One

After You’re Gone – James P. Johnson’s Blue Note Jazzmen
The Call of the Blues – Sidney DeParis’ Blue Note Jazzmen
Maple Leaf Rag – Art Hodes’ Chicagoans
Blue Horizon – Sidney Bechet & His New Orleans Feetwarmers
If I Had You – Ike Quebec Swingtet

Side Two

Limehouse Blues – Benny Morton’s All Stars
Milenberg Joys – Bunk Johnson with Sidney Bechet Orchestra
Dameronia – Tadd Dameron Sextet
‘Round About Midnight – Thelonious Monk Quintet
Tin Tin Deo – James Moody and His Bop Men

BlueNoteJazzInsert

Sade’s Paradise


Sade are an English soul band formed in London in 1983. The band was named after their lead singer Sade (more on her a bit below). Their music features elements of soul, R&B, jazz, and soft rock.

Sade’s debut album, Diamond Life, was released in 1984 It reached No. 2 on the U.K. Album Chart, selling over 1.2 million copies in the U.K.. The album was also a hit internationally, reaching No. 1 in several countries and the top ten in the U.S.. Sade’s sixth studio album, Soldier of Love, was released on 8 February 2010, and peaked at No. 4 in the U.K., and No. 1 in the U.S..

Helen Folasade Adu, OBE, better known as Sade, is the British Nigerian front woman and lead vocalist of the group Sade. In 2002, she received an OBE from Prince Charles at Buckingham Palace for services to music, and she dedicated her award to “all black women in England”.

Sade

Side One

Paradise

Side Two

Super Bien Total

Catch as Catch Can


Sometimes, when my roommate has doctor’s appointments in the city for his CIDP or diabetes, I send him on little record store excursions to kill time. One recent trip to Underground Hip Hop resulted in the purchase of Glue’s last LP.

Adam Michael Arnone (born May 19, 1978), better known by his stage name Adeem (pronounced “A-D-M” and sometimes styled ADeeM), is an independent American rapper from Keene, New Hampshire. Adeem is best known for his work in the hip hop group Glue and for winning the Scribble Jam Emcee Battle in 1998 and 2001.

You can totally look up of his other connections and collaborations but Glue also worked with Sage Francis and I’ve posted his albums before.

Glue (Adeem with Maker & DJ DQ) Discography

Seconds Away (Ramona Records, 2003)
Sunset Lodge (Shake It Records, 2005)
Catch as Catch Can (Fat Beats Records, 2006)

Glue

Catch as Catch Can

Glue

Album One

Side One

Catch as…
Stride (Anxiety Get Gone)
Beat Beat Beat
A Lot to Say

Side Two

Restless
State of the World
A Fly Can’t Bird
Pan Slomp
Making a Mess

Album Two

Side One

Belmont and Clark
Hometown Anthem
Glupies

Side Two

In Between Her
Never Really Know
Vessel
Truth or Dare

If You Want Me To Stay Sober At The Grammy Awards…


A Sly and the Family Stone tribute took place at the 2006 Grammy Awards on February 8, 2006. The original plan, to have been a surprise for audiences, was to feature a reunion performance by the original Sly and the Family Stone lineup as the highlight of the tribute. However, the Grammy Award show’s producers were worried that Sly Stone, who missed some of the rehearsals and belatedly arrived for others (his drug use was heavy and behavior unpredictable), would miss the show.

The tribute began halfway through the Grammy Awards ceremony, and was introduced by comedian Dave Chappelle. It featured performers such as John Legend, Ciara, Steven Tyler and Joe Perry of Aerosmith performing classic Sly and the Family Stone songs.

After the first half of “I Want to Take You Higher”, the Family Stone took the stage alongside the other musicians, and Steven Tyler called backstage “Hey, Sly; let’s do it the way we used to do it!” Sporting a blonde mohawk hairdo, sunglasses, and a silver lamé suit, Sly Stone emerged and contributed vocals and keyboards to a continuation of “I Want To Take You Higher.” Three minutes into the performance, Sly tossed a wave to the audience and exited the stage, leaving the Family Stone and the guest performers to complete the number alone.

Sly’s unusual appearance and brief performance garnered highly mixed reviews and was covered throughout the press. An Associated Press report referred to Sly as the “J. D. Salinger of funk” and simply referred to the performance as being “bizarre”. MTV News was much less complimentary: “The Grammy performance—Sly’s first with the original Family Stone since 1971—was a halting, confused affair and a complete disservice to his music.” Another AP report stated that “nineteen years after his last live performance, Sly Stone proved he’s still able to steal the show.”

SlyFamStone02

Side One

If You Want Me to Stay

Side Two

Babies Makin’ Babies